Recognise Losses to Wallabies

​Photos of how to know  when there is a problem; and when you need to make a effective plan.

photo of a green, lush pasture with a working wallaby fence

See the gains from a successful fence.


photo of a green, lush pasture with a working wallaby fence

The difference where wallabies are excluded


photo of a pasture where green growth has been eaten away around the edged of the paddock, close to the bush

Graduated losses. If there is no grass or crop near the bush, but plenty in the middle of the paddock, it is wallabies.


photo of a pasture where green growth has been eaten away around the edged of the paddock, close to the bush

If a crop won’t grow near the bush edge, think wallabies and brushtail possums.


photo of a test patch in a pasture of grass to discover if growth is being eaten by browsing animals

Cover some pasture with mesh and see what could be grown when wallabies are excluded.


A farmer testing for losses placed this cage 75 metres from the bush edge.

A farmer testing for losses placed this cage 75 metres from the bush edge.


In higher rainfall areas research shows 67% pasture loss in red and orange damage zones (out to 100 metres) and 34% in yellow zone from 100 to 300 metres.  That is; an average of 45% loss from the bush edge to 300 metres where controls are ineffective (Grey zone is bush/refuge and other colours are damage zones).

contact dpipwe for this diagram in another format

Image from BITE - DPIPWE computer program that uses data from Alternatives to 1080 pasture losses research to analyse pasture and financial losses caused by wallabies and brushtail possums.

Bennett's wallaby poo

Bennetts Wallaby


rufous wallaby/pademelon poo

Rufous Wallaby/Tasmanian Pademelon


Brushtail Possum poo

Brushtail Possum


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