Households

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Fruit fly was detected in Tasmania in early 2018. The Government, industry and the community have ​worked hard to control and eradicate this pest from our state. 

 
Fruit fly poses a real threat to our industries, economy, environment and our way of life.

Every Tasmanian can help protect our state from a fruit fly outbreak by following these simple guidelines


Fruit fly was detected in northern Tasmania in January 2018.  The Government, industry and the community have since worked hard to eradicate this pest.​ Part of the control and eradication actions included the declaration of temporary Control Areas and Infected Areas enforcing restrictions on host produce moving in and out of these areas.

​​Control Area - To restrict movement of fruit fly and to protect markets for growers outside the affected area, Biosecurity Tasmania has established temporary Control Areas with a 15km minimum radius around initial detection points. 

Host produce cannot move from inside a Control Area to outside without adhering to appropriate treatment protocols. 

Infecte​d Area - To restrict movement of fruit fly and to protect markets for growers outside the affected area, Biosecurity Tasmania has established temporary Infected Areas with a 1.5km minimum radius around initial detection points. 

Within these areas, conditions apply to the movement of fruit fly host produce, including home-grown, foraged and shop- bought produce, which cannot be moved outside these Infected Areas. 

This map shows the Control Areas in the north of the state and by clicking through you will also see the Infected Areas. If you live in or are travelling to these parts of Tasmania please ​abide by the following:
  • Do NOT move host produce from inside a Control Area to outside of a Contro​l Area.
  • Do NOT move host produce from inside an Infected Area to outside of an Infected Area.
  • Obey all signs and use the quarantine disposal bins provided when leaving the Control  Areas.
  • Be on the lookout for signs of fruit fly​ and report suspect produce to Biosecurity Tasmania on 6165 3774.

Living in a Control Area or Infected Area​​​

Do I live in a Control Area or Infected Area?

You can check if you live in a Control Area using the detailed Control Areas map on the LIST (Land Information System Tasmania). Maps of Control Areas and Infected Areas can be found in the formal declaration documents, in this map summary document or by clicking on the map above. 

What being in a Control Area means for residents:


Biosecurity Tasmania has advised that as of 1 October, Control Area restrictions have changed to enable growers to sell their produce within the Control Areas.

  • Do NOT move host produce from inside a Control Area to outside a Control Area
  • From 1 October you CAN: 
    • Move home-grown host produce from your property (give away or sell), as long as it does not leave a Control Area.
    • Dispose of fruit as normal – double-bagging is no longer required. 
    • Compost fruit in the Control Area.
  • If you live in an Infected Area further restrictions apply. 

​What being in an Infected Area means for residents:

  • You can consume home-grown host produce at home.
  • Do NOT move, give away or sell host produce from your property unless cooked or processed. 
  • Cut-up fruit can be moved from your property if it is to be consumed, e.g. - in lunch boxes - with remains double-bagged.
  • You can buy host produce from retailers within a Control/Infected Area and transport it home – but you cannot then transport it outside an Infected Area.
  • Please ensure all rotten, fallen or remains of host produce are double-bagged prior to placing in general waste.
  • Do NOTcompost host produce inside an Infected Area.
  • Report all suspect produce to Biosecurity Tasmania on 6165 3774.

What is fruit fly ‘host produce’?

Most types of fruit, including some produce commonly referred to as vegetables, can host Queensland fruit fly. Host produce includes, but is not limited to, apples, apricots, avocadoes, bananas, blackberries, capsicum, cherries, chillies, eggplant, figs, grapefruit, grapes, limes, mangoes, mulberries, nectarines, oranges, peaches, pears, plums, quince, raspberries, strawberries and tomatoes. Please see the complete fruit fly host produce list.

Can I buy and take home host produce from a store that is within the Control Area or Infected Area?

Control Area
Yes. Host produce purchased in retail stores has met biosecurity requirements. You can take store-bought host produce anywhere within the Control Area, BUT you cannot take it out of the Control Area.

Infected Area
Yes. Host produce purchased in retail stores has met biosecurity requirements. You can take store-bought host produce anywhere within the Infected Area, BUT you cannot take it out of the Infected Area.


​Can I take cooked or cut host produce outside the Control Area or Infected Area?

Yes. Host produce that has been processed (cooked, preserved, cut up in a salad or sliced in a sandwich), can be transported outside the Control Area and Infected Area.

If I live in a Control Area or Infected Area, can I eat my home-grown host produce at home?

Yes. There is no restriction for eating your home-grown host produce at home. If you are in an Infected Area, the remains should be double-bagged.

How can I safely dispose of uneaten, rotten or fallen host produce in a Control Area or Infected Area?

Control Area
Dispose of host produce as normal – double-​​bagging is no longer required - but if you think the fruit might be infested with fruit fly, please contact Biosecurity Tasmania adding on the Fruit Fly Hotline immediately.

Infected Area
To assist in preventing the spread of fruit fly it is suggested that within an Infected Area, you double-bag any uneaten host produce including apple cores and vegetable scraps, in sealed plastic bags before putting it in a general waste bin.

What is double-bagging?

Double-bagging means putting host produce in one plastic bag and sealing it, then placing that sealed bag in a second plastic bag and again sealing the bag. You can then dispose of the double-bagged host produce in general waste bins.

 

Can I compo​​st host pro​​​duce at home?

Control Area
Yes.  If you are in a Control Area, but outside an Infected Area, as of 1 October, it is fine to compost fruit and vegetable scraps.

Infected Area
No, fruit fly larvae can survive the composting process. A suggested option is to keep any host fruit waste separate from other green waste and to double-bag and dispose of it in the general waste bin.

Can I feed host produce remains to small animals, such as chickens?

​​Control Area
Yes

Infected Area
No

Can pips be affected by fruit fly?

No, just the flesh of the host produce is affected.

When leaving a Control Area is there a place I can dispose of host produce if I need to?

Yes. Signs will alert you to when you are about to leave the Control Area. The signs will ask you to dispose of host produce in the disposal bins provided at that location. Disposal bins are emptied regularly.

Can I enter the Control Area with fruit fly host produce?

Yes, but once inside the Control Area, it cannot be taken back out. Signs will alert you to when you are about to enter the Control Area.

Didn’t winter kill them?

Existing modelling suggests that the likelihood of Queensland fruit fly surviving long enough to establish a permanent population in most parts of mainland Tasmania is very low. However, we still need to take a risk-based approach to protect Tasmania's Fruit Fly Free status.


Contact

Fruit Fly Hotline
Report any suspected fruit fly to Biosecurity Tasmania
Phone: (03) 6165 3774

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