Pacific Oyster Mortality Syndrome (POMS)

​POMS Background

Pacific Oyster Mortality Syndrome (POMS) was first seen in Australia in NSW in 2010. Since then movement restrictions have been in place on oysters and oyster products to reduce the risk of spread to other areas.

The POMS virus was first detected in Tasmania when it caused a high level of mortalities at an oyster lease in late January 2016, however tests on stored frozen oysters indicated that the virus has been present in the State since at least mid-December 2015. ​

Since the detection in late January 2016, Biosecurity Tasmania and the Tasmanian oyster industry have been working together to manage the effects of this disease on the Tasmanian oyster industry.  Whilst the disease is a concern for oyster producers, healthy oysters can still be harvested and product being sold through retail outlets remains safe to eat.

The initial response to POMS in Tasmania included restrictions on the movement of oysters onto oyster farms while a structured testing program was undertaken to determine where the virus was present in the State. This testing program made it possible to assess oyster movements that could occur between farms without spreading the virus.

Based on the information from the POMS testing program three (3) areas of differing disease risk have been determined as a basis for issuing movement permits. These areas are:

  • POMS free area across the north of Tasmania;
  • Intermediate risk areas where there is little or no evidence of disease, but a risk of introduction of the disease; and
  • An infected area where POMS is known to occur.


The current list of bays within the three (3) areas of differing disease risk can be found under Area Classification below.

Movements are allowed under permit; both within a risk area and into another area where there is a higher risk of POMS being present. Movements are not allowed from an area of high risk to an area with a lower level of risk of POMS being present.

A permit is required to be able to move oysters from one oyster growing area to be placed on a farm in another area. Details of how to apply for a permit are here on the DPIPWE web site.

Experience in other countries and other states indicates that the major cause of rapid spread of the POMS virus is by movement of oysters between oyster farms. The movement controls still in place are designed to reduce the risk of this type of spread of the virus.

As the virus is now established in Tasmania we do have to expect some natural spread to other areas, however, controlling movement of oysters should help slow the overall spread of the virus and give some much needed time for the industry to be able to establish long term strategies to manage this disease.

Options for long term management include work already being undertaken by the industry to develop strains of oysters resistant to the disease. DPIPWE continues to work with the oyster industry to assist it to recover from this disease event and develop options for future management of oysters in an environment where POMS occurs.

It is important to note that oysters harvested for human consumption that are not going to be placed on another oyster farm can be moved without a permit. POMS does not affect human health and oysters on the market are safe to eat.


Area Classification

Area classifications are designated according to the level of risk that the POMS virus is present in a bay and may change from time to time. Surveillance to verify the status of the free areas is conducted annually druing the period when POMS is most likely to be detected. The different areas determine the basis for issuing movement permits. These areas are:

  • POMS free area across the north of Tasmania,
  • Intermediate risk areas where there is little or no evidence of disease, but a risk of introduction of the disease; and
  • An infected area where POMS is known to occur.

The current list of three (3) areas of differing disease risk is:

POMS Free areas

This is all areas of Tasmania north of a line through Launceston.

  • Sea Elephant Bay (King Island)
  • Montague
  • Duck Bay
  • Big Bay
  • Port Sorell
  • Moulting Bay (Georges Bay)

Intermediate areas

This is the Huon-Channel area, Norfolk Bay and Great Oyster Bay.

  • Great Oyster Bay
  • Great Swanport
  • King George Sound
  • Eaglehawk Bay
  • Garfish Bay
  • Little Norfolk Bay
  • Port Arthur
  • Fleurtys Point
  • Great Bay
  • Long Bay Reef
  • Little Taylors Bay
  • Cloudy Bay Lagoon
  • Port Esperance
  • Hastings Bay
  • Recherche Bay
  • Dunalley Bay

Infected areas

  • Little Swanport
  • Blackman Bay
  • Pitt Water (inclduing Island Inlet)
  • Pipe Clay Lagoon
  • Port Cygnet (including Gardners Bay and Deep Bay)

Movements are allowed under permit; both within a risk area and into another area where there is a higher risk of POMS presence. Movements will not be allowed from an area of high risk to an area with a lower level of risk of POMS being present.

Permit applications can be downloaded from this link: Movement Permit Application. Hard copies of the form can be arranged by calling 03 6165 4825.​


POMS Contacts in DPIPWE

Please contact John Preston on 03 6165 4825 or 0428 504 150 for Permit enquiries or any other issues to do with POMS.


​​​Movement Permit Application Form​

Permit application can be downloaded from this link: Movement Permit Application. Hard copies of the form can be arranged by calling 6165 4825.

 

A permit will cover the authorised movement of oysters or oyster equipment. Permit applications should be forwarded to Biosecurity Tasmania as early as possible in the movement planning stage. Note that there is a five (5) working day maximum turnaround on permits. Usually permits are issued well within this period, however this is dependent on demand.

 
 

​​​Current Situation

14 March 2018

POMS detected in new and previously affected areas

POMS was confirmed in Gardners Bay near Cygnet in February 2018.  As a result the area of Port Cygnet, which includes Gardners Bay and Deep Bay, has been declared an infected area. The POMS virus has not been detected in any other Channel areas this season.

There have not been any further detections of POMS outside previously confirmed sites.

While the disease is a concern for oyster producers, POMS does not affect people. Oysters available on the commercial market are safe to eat. 

Since detection in 2016, Biosecurity Tasmania and the Tasmanian oyster industry have been working together to manage the effects of this disease, including the appointment of a designated oyster biosecurity officer.

The development of POMS is temperature dependent, meaning that while there was no evidence of the disease over winter, it was expected to reappear this summer with affected areas likely to experience mortalities.  

Biosecurity Tasmania continues to undertake structured testing and surveillance programs in POMS-free areas to monitor their status. 

To protect the Tasmanian oyster industry, a statewide Control Area declaration is in place restricting the movement of oysters, animal materials and conveyances used in the production of oysters.

Movement Permits are required for any movements of live oysters or oyster equipment throughout Tasmania.




 

POMS - Control Area Declaration (9 February 2016)

A Control Area has been declared for the whole of Tasmania under the Animal Health Act 1995 restricting the movement of oysters and animal materials and conveyances used in the production of oysters.

More information on the Control Area​ Declaration and copies of the formal Declarations​.


Reporting of Mortalities in Aquatic Animals

Any unexplained and significant mortality of oysters (greater than 5 percent) should be reported to:​

Contact

Biosecurity Tasmania - POMS Permits and Advice
John Preston
Phone: 6165 4825, or 1800 675 888 for after hours
Email: POMSTas@dpipwe.tas.gov.au​​
Website: dpipwe.tas.gov.au/poms